Cheese-o-pedia: G

  1. Gorgonzola

    Exceptional flavor with a rich, creamy texture and beautiful, consistent greenish blue veining. It is a cow's milk cheese that is known for its slightly piquant, full, earthy flavor. Gorgonzola gets its name from the town located in the Po Valley near Milan where it has been made since A.D. 879.

    Heat and toss gorgonzola with pasta or stir it into risotto or mashed potatoes. Gorgonzola matches nicely with fish, poultry and beef dishes and makes a nice snack with pears, apples, walnuts, cashews and apricots.

    Pair gorgonzola with red wines like Pinot Noir, Merlot and Zinfandel, or dessert wines like Port and Late Harvest Rieslings.

  2. Gouda

    A semi-soft to hard cheese similar to Edam. Aged one to four months for a mild and buttery flavor.

    Originally from the village of Gouda, northeast of Rotterdam, in the Netherlands, Gouda cheese, pronounced "how-da" by the Dutch, was already being exported to other countries as far back as the 13th century. Today, Gouda is the largest selling cheese in Holland representing 60% of all cheese production. It is typically encased in an inedible red wax rind. Made from full cow’s milk it has a semi-firm, straw-colored body scattered with a few small irregular holes. Gouda’s nutty and mellow flavor is also available in a smoked variety.

    This classic snacking cheese is also excellent on sandwiches and burgers, or on a fruit tray.

    Pair Gouda with Beaujolais Villages or lager beer.

  3. Grana

    The Italian term for hard-grating cheese.

  4. Grana Padano

    Hard, straw-colored cow's milk cheese from Northern Italy's Po Valley that is very similar to Parmigiano Reggiano®. Grana Padano has become popular in the states for its mellow, nutty flavor. Grana means "grain" in Italian and originates from the 11th century. Its main differences from Parmigiano Reggiano® are that it is allowed to be handmade year round and can be sold after it has aged a shorter period of time. Its name is legally protected "D.O.C.," and production is strictly controlled. Made from partially skimmed cow's milk, Grana Padano is very high in protein and other nutrients. It has a compact grainy texture and an inedible hard oily rind.

    Grana Padano can be grated and served in pasta dishes, soups and salads, or eaten with dried fruit and nuts.

    Pair Grana Padano with Barolo, Chianti or Brunello.

  5. Gruyère

    An earthy hard cheese with a nutty and fruity flavor. Inedible light brown natural rind is stamped with “Gruyère” and “Switzerland” in blue or red. This cow's milk cheese is aged a minimum of 100 days and is peppered with tiny round holes.

    Gruyère originated before the 12th century and is named after the District of Gruyeres in the canton of Fribourg in French-speaking Switzerland. As with all the other name-controlled Swiss cheeses, always look for the Swiss Seal and Swiss name on the rind of the cheese.

    Gruyère can be mixed with Emmental for fondue, used for making Mornay sauce or melted over vegetables.

    Pair Gruyère with Rhone whites, Pinot Noir or Cabernet Sauvignon.